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An Antique Bronze Snake Deity - Nagi

Antique Bronze Snake Deity

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Antique Bronze Snake Deity
Antique Bronze Snake Deity

Antique Bronze Snake Deity
Antique Bronze Snake Deity

Antique Bronze Snake Deity
Antique Bronze Snake Deity

Antique Bronze Snake Deity
Antique Bronze Snake Deity

Antique Bronze Snake Deity
Antique Bronze Snake Deity

Antique Bronze Snake Deity


Antique Bronze Snake Deity


Antique Bronze Snake Deity

The crowned and bejewelled female figure with a human head and torso and a snake/serpent lower body, curled beneath her and forming the base.

She offers forth a conch shell with both hands, her arms wrapped in ribbons, outstretched wings to her back and a snake canopy rising above her head.

Very nicely chased and engraved, particularly to the canopy, crown, wings and lower body.


Missing part of ribbon from lower left arm
General overall wear
Very heavy

Measures 8 1/2" ( 21.5 cm )


Generally known as Naga's, the rarer female interpretations are called nagi or nagini.

Naga cults and folklore are very much a part of contemporary cultural traditions in Hindu regions of Asia (India, Nepal, and the island of Bali).

Followers consider nagas nature spirits, guardians of treasure, carriers of the elixir of life and immortality and the protectors of springs, wells, rivers, lakes and seas.

They also bring rain and in some parts of southern India are given great reverence where it is believed that they bring fertility and prosperity.

The converse being that they're thought to bring disasters such as floods and drought, malevolent actions that traditions suggest nagas cause when they've been mistreated or as a reaction to mankind's disrespectful actions in relation to the environment.

This bronze may be a representation of Kadru, the ancestral mother of snakes.

She is written about in both the major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata and although given different titles in each, both epics consider Kadru a major ruler and deity.



Item no; TN-160610-1174-1
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© Copyright; Richard Willsher Antique Asian Art 2011

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